A new banking trojan has emerged and is going after users’ Android devices. Dubbed Cerberus, this remote access trojan allows a distant attacker to take over an infected Android device, giving the attacker the ability to conduct overlay attacks, gain SMS control, and harvest the victim’s contact list. What’s more, the author of the Cerberus malware has decided to rent out the banking trojan to other cybercriminals as a means to spread these attacks.

According to The Hacker News, the author claims that this malware was completely written from scratch and doesn’t reuse code from other existing banking trojans. Researchers who analyzed a sample of the Cerberus trojan found that it has a pretty common list of features including the ability to take screenshots, hijacking SMS messages, stealing contact lists, stealing account credentials, and more.

When an Android device becomes infected with the Cerberus trojan, the malware hides its icon from the application drawer. Then, it disguises itself as Flash Player Service to gain accessibility permission. If permission is granted, Cerberus will automatically register the compromised device to its command-and-control server, allowing the attacker to control the device remotely. To steal a victim’s credit card number or banking information, Cerberus launches remote screen overlay attacks. This type of attack displays an overlay on top of legitimate mobile banking apps and tricks users into entering their credentials onto a fake login screen. What’s more, Cerberus has already developed overlay attacks for a total of 30 unique targets and banking apps.

So, what can Android users do to secure their devices from the Cerberus banking trojan? Check out the following tips to help keep your financial data safe:

  • Be careful what you download.Cerberus malware relies on social engineering tactics to make its way onto a victim’s device. Therefore, think twice about what you download or even plug into your device.
  • Click with caution.Only click on links from trusted sources. If you receive an email or text message from an unknown sender asking you to click on a suspicious link, stay cautious and avoid interacting with the message altogether.
  • Use comprehensive security. Whether you’re using a mobile banking app on your phone or browsing the internet on your desktop, it’s important to safeguard all of your devices with an extra layer of security. Use robust security software like McAfee Total Protection so you can connect with confidence.

And, of course, stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats by following me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable?, and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

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