Perhaps the worst reason to choose a complex solution is that it’s new, and the newness makes it feel like choosing it makes you on top of technology and doing your job well. Old and boring may just what you need to do your job well.

Dan McKinley writes:

“Boring” should not be conflated with “bad.” There is technology out there that is both boring and bad. You should not use any of that. But there are many choices of technology that are boring and good, or at least good enough. MySQL is boring. Postgres is boring. PHP is boring. Python is boring. Memcached is boring. Squid is boring. Cron is boring.

The nice thing about boringness (so constrained) is that the capabilities of these things are well understood. But more importantly, their failure modes are well understood.

Rachel Andrew wrote that choosing established technology for the CMS she builds was a no-brainer because it’s what her customers had.

You’re going to hear less about old and boring technology. If you’re consuming a healthy diet of tech news, you probably won’t read many blog posts about old and boring technology. It’s too bad really, I, for one, would enjoy that. But I get it, publications need to have fresh writing and writers are less excited about topics that have been well-trod over decades.

As David DeSandro says, “New tech gets chatter”. When there is little to say, you just don’t say it.

You don’t hear about TextMate because TextMate is old. What would I tweet? Still using TextMate. Still good.

While we hear more about new tech, it’s old tech that is more well known, including what it’s bad at. If newer tech, perhaps more complicated tech, is needed because it solves a known pain point, that’s great, but when it doesn’t…

You are perfectly okay to stick with what works for you. The more you use something, the clearer its pain points become. Try new technologies when you’re ready to address those pain points. Don’t feel obligated to change your workflow because of chatter. New tech gets chatter, but that doesn’t make it any better.

Adam Silver says that a boring developer is full of questions:

“Will debugging code be more difficult?”, “Might performance degrade?” and “Will I be slowed down due to compile times?”

Dan Kim is also proud of being boring:

I have a confession to make — I’m not a rock star programmer. Nor am I a hacker. I don’t know ninjutsu. Nobody has ever called me a wizard.

Still, I take pride in the fact that I’m a good, solid programmer.

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